share

History of Our School

Gipsy Hill

Fenstanton Junior and Infant Schools were built in 1950, on the site of the old Fenstanton House, which was on the site since 1870, and was a huge 15 bedroom Victorian mansion with a tower room which had panoramic views in all directions. 

When Fenstanton opened in 1952, it was regarded as a model of design, with each class having a “wall of window” overlooking the playgrounds.  It was initially called Upper Tulse Hill School, but shortly after became known as Fenstanton.  The Junior and Infant schools were amalgamated in 2001. 

As with most model schools built in the 1950s, the life expectancy was only around 25 years.  The original building became far too small for the number of local children who wanted to attend, so portacabins were put all around the site.  In 2013, a brand new multi-million pound school opened on the same site providing exceptional accommodation over three floors. There are three classes in every Year Group. Similar to other Gipsy Hill Federation sites, the new school has specialist rooms for music and various learning support spaces which support all pupils to make excellent progress. The new Fenstanton building also reflects transformed standards in the school and supports its new status as the first choice school in the Tulse Hill area.  The school has already gained a reputation for rapid change, significantly improved and high standards, and for providing excellent teaching.

latest stories
  • Year 5 Residential Trip 2017

    Year 5 Residential Trip 2017 Day 1 What a fantastic start to our trip! The coach journey was excellent and it was a real adventure to be in a coach, on a train whilst under the sea! Our teachers were so well organised that we were able to take advantage of an earlier train which meant we could have more time in France. We arrived in Boulogne and were thrilled to be able to get off the coach and stretch our legs. Once off the coach, we went to an adventure playground to have our lunch and a play before attending The Nausica Sea Life Centre. The Sea Life Centre was absolutely amazing. We saw all sorts of wonderful creatures including sea horses, sharks, jelly fish and even a dancing seal that AJ named Jeff. Our adults were really impressed with us because the staff within the Sea life Centre were commenting on how well behaved we were and the kind manners we showed. After all of the excitement we were secretly happy to be heading towards our final destination. When the coach pulled up outside our accommodation, the bus erupted with a loud roar of "yay", "wow", "look at our mansion!". After dinner, we had a range of exciting evening activities. Our group did climbing. We enjoyed cheering each other on and challenging each other to reach past our highest climbing point. Written by Glenbrook and Fenstanton children in Group A. Day 2 On day two we went to visit Wellington Quarry in Arras. We went through the tunnel that the French, British and the Kiwis (aka the people from New Zealand) built. After we went to a famous battlefield and looked at the German and British trenches. We then went to The Vimy Ridge Memorial, learning about all the missing Canadian Soldiers. Later we went to a German cemetery and looked at the differences between the German soldier cemetery and the typical soldier cemetery. The difference is that the German soldiers cross had to be grey because of the guilt of starting the war and causing so much pain. Written by Oren & Niyah Y5 Hummingbird Class Day 3 We went to the picturesque city of Rouen, where we visited one of the many Notre Dame's in France. Notre Dame means ‘Our lady’. We visited the cathedral and looked and discussed it’s decorative appearance. We loved looking and learning about the stained glass windows and how they had to be carefully reconstructed after the city was bombed. In 1999 the cathedral’s spire fell and damaged the roof. Inside you could see where parts of the roof had to be replaced. In addition to the cathedral, we learned a lot about Joan of Arc. She believed that she received a message from God to lead the French to victory! Joan of Arc was involved in a famous part of history which is referred to as "The Hundred Years' War". At the young age of 19, Joan of Arc was burned at the stake by the English. Later, we had an opportunity to buy some souvenirs to remember the special city of Rouen. Written by Anna-Nicole from Y5 Chaffinch Class, Glenbrook and Shanai from Y5 Kestrel Class, Fenstanton

    19/04/17
    Year 5 Residential Trip 2017
view all stories
  • Kingswood Primary School Lower Site
  • Kingswood Primary School Upper Site
  • Elm Wood Primary School
  • Paxton Primary School
  • Crawford Primary School
  • Fernstanton Primary School
  • Glenbrook Primary School
school contacts

How To Find Us

Contact Gipsy
Hill Federation